Dude & Mini Dude's 2017 Ride-2-Survive

Discussion in 'Fundraisers & Events' started by Dude, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. Dude

    Lifetime Better Bastard

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    It is time…

    2016 is here: https://takethepiss.com/threads/dude-mini-dudes-2016-ride-2-survive.20786/

    Previous years can be found on the first page of each year. It’s very interesting to go back through the years, and see the changes, and see the constants. Some of you guys have supported me every time, and donated a lot of dough. It’s not lost on me…

    It’s now been 9 year involved with this little R2S thingy that has changed my life.

    How?

    Well, not so much in my awareness of the challenges in fighting cancers, and the need for raising money for research. I will gladly admit to becoming more educated on the issues, and less cynical. The cause is just, the vehicle (R2S), one of the best I’ve ever come across. The reality?

    It’s the people, and what they have done for me.

    As you will read in mine and Mini Dude’s page here (warning, another typically long Dude read), when you are part of this event, you come to know some incredibly inspiring people.

    I have written countless pages here about what this event has meant for my son…both on a personal level, and on a growth level. He’s 17 this year, and going into HIS 4th year as a rider. This is a grueling TEAM event…not going to lie, it’s hard for me, every year. I’ve done some tough events- twice the Ironman- and I can honestly say this event can be tougher. Last year it sure was, with the driving wind and rain, and the added hours, it was a test of mental fortitude I never had to face while racing. When you race, you are racing for one. When you ride R2S, you are riding for everyone. Your team. Your sponsors. Your loved ones. The emotional weight of that task is substantial. Yes, it’s just a ride, and it’s just a bike, but…when you learn how much you are doing means to the people who send you notes of thanks, well…there comes with it a certain sense of responsibility. In that group of amazing and inspiring people, I know my place…it is to get them through their goal, get them home, and get them home safely.

    That all said, I’ve watched my son grow into a leader on this ride. He’s now one of those guys counted on to lead well, to help others when needed, to be a boss.

    This year on my R2S “Blog”, I’m going to write about the people I’ve met over the years, and what they’ve meant to me.

    Oh, and WE NEED DONATIONS! Our donation page is here: http://convio.cancer.ca/site/TR/Otherspecialevents/IFE_BC_even_?px=7098048&pg=personal&fr_id=22233

    Give if you can, we’d really appreciate it, but if anything, please go to www.r2s.ca and learn about what we do. My two promises:

    ~Not one penny goes towards covering overhead, all will go towards Cancer research.

    ~Your donations buys you as many spots as you request sharppied onto my arms and legs for the day of the ride. I will carry the spirit of your angel on my wings. Just send me a PM with your angel’s name, and they book their spot.

    Many thanks, Gents. It’s a slice every year, Michael and I are looking forward to doing our bit again.

    ~Mike & Michael. http://convio.cancer.ca/site/TR/Otherspecialevents/IFE_BC_even_?px=7098048&pg=personal&fr_id=22233
     
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  2. Reds-16

    Reds-16 Well-Known Member

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    To see Laylas name on your leg literally brought me to tears just now Dude. You are a very humble HERO and can count on my support again this year,

    Thank You Sir for what you do.
     
  3. Dude

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    Kind words.

    A hero is a lot of things to a lot of people.

    Teachers, firemen, cops, soldiers, coaches, volunteers....we (meaning you, I, the collective "we") are all trying to do our parts.

    Growing up, for me, they were my coaches, and my Mum.

    Over the next few weeks I'll take some time to write about the many associated with R2S.
     
  4. Dude

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    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg This is Steve Parsons. I met him in 2014, when he took on the R2S in his unyielding fight against cancer. He is the creator and lead man for "Team Taylor", named after his son. Steve has lived my nightmare; his son Taylor lost his battle in 2003 at the age of 14. Michael was 13 when I met Steve, on a ride. I was helping him up a hill.

    Steve has picked a fight and he won't stop. One visit to his FB page tells the story:

    "Feb 4th is World Cancer Day.

    Taking place under the tagline ‘We can. I can.’, World Cancer Day 2016-2018 will explore how everyone – as a collective or as individuals – can do their part to reduce the global burden of cancer.

    Just as cancer affects everyone in different ways, all people have the power to take various actions to reduce the impact that cancer has on individuals, families and communities.

    World Cancer Day is a chance to reflect on what you can do, make a pledge and take action. Whatever you choose to do ‘We can. I can.’ make a difference to the fight against cancer.

    What I am doing is creating a team of 150 people to ride our bikes to Seattle in August and raise $500,000 for Cancer Research. This is in honour of my son, Taylor who lost his battle with cancer in 2003. We have 49 riders registered. I have a spot for you.

    Make a difference by either joining me on this ride or donating."
    I don't know what Steve's all-time tally is, but it has to be over a million alone. He inspires those around him to be better. As you can see, he's one of those guys I will- in jest- say has no business being on a bike. He doesn't give a shite (and truthfully, I bet he's lost over 100 lbs since I first met him).

    I will push Steve up any hill. All. Day. Long.
     
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    #4 Dude, Feb 14, 2017
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  5. Rangerforever

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    Firemen?
    Heroes to wee cats in trees maybe. ;) :D

    Fcukcancerforever
     
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  6. Dude

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    It's those ladder and fancy hat thingies they wear. Very heroic looking. If they had capes, it'd be the real deal.
     
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  7. Rangerforever

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    You almost degrade the hats by calling them thingies.

    How do you know when there's a Fireman in the room?
    Oh don't worry - They'll tell you...
     
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  8. Dude

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    This has shaken me, not going to lie: http://edmonton.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1059503&binId=1.1203428&playlistPageNum=1

    In the "Natural order vs. Medical advancement" debate, this is where I draw a hard line in the sand.

    What would the Earth's population problem be without a disease like Cancer? Substantially larger, one would argue. In finding a cure for various forms of Cancer, are we in fact creating a larger problem?

    This is the pragmatic side of me thinking. Then, there is the emotional side...

    Young kids, and young parents...whenever I read a story about one or the other contracting the disease, and what it does to tear apart young families, I lose the pragmatic, analytical argument with myself.

    I have never been shy about why I do this, and that is out of the almost paralyzing fear I have of this striking me, or worse, my wife, and worse than that, my children. I can't imagine myself being strong enough to fight the battle.

    I don't know Todd personally, but because this is a matter close to home- in our footballing community- it sends an extra bit of that sickening feeling into my gut.

    Kind of like when Keeper passed.

    I have yet to donate to my own page, so today I'm going to do so, and Ryder will be my angel.
     
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    #8 Dude, Feb 20, 2017
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  9. Dude

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    Al McNabb & Rochelle Davidson


    I met both Al & Rochelle through R2S. Rochelle will be riding her 10th this season, and Al (I think) his 6th or 7th. Rochelle is the only person to ride every single KM for 9 years, which means of all the R2S riders over the years, she’s put in the most KMs.

    Why them? Because of this:

    https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/FundraisingPage.aspx?registrationID=3641974&langPref=en-CA&Referrer=&Referrer=%26Referrer%3dhttps%253a%252f%252fsecure.e2rm.com%252fregistrant%252fFundraisingPage.aspx%253fRegistrationID%253d3646278#&panel1-6

    https://secure.e2rm.com/registrant/FundraisingPage.aspx?registrationID=3646278&langPref=en-CA&Referrer=&Referrer=%26Referrer%3dhttps%253a%252f%252fsecure.e2rm.com%252fregistrant%252fFundraisingPage.aspx%253fRegistrationID%253d3646278#&panel1-1

    They are taking the fight to new levels by joining the Sears National Kids Cancer Ride…about the only event I can think of that is crazier and more challenging than ours.

    About each…

    Al lost his first wife to cancer about 15 years ago. At the time, his kids were in their teens, and her death very nearly tore his family apart…but in truth it has made everyone stronger. That the way it seems to go…it’ll kill the surviving family, or make them stronger. Al is now a retired Fire Captain, I think out of the South Surrey area. He hung up his badge a couple of years ago, and now has nothing but time for his various pet projects. He, along with June (his second wife), and the types of people you want to be around, and who are full-in when it comes to R2S. Beyond that, it’s Al’s leadership that I admire. He’s a strong rider, for sure, but the way he can command his authority, and motivate others, is something I admire. One of my most vivid memories was from two years back. We were out on a big ride, a 200 KM three weeks out of R2S. Michael was 15 then, in his second year. He was becoming a good rider, but when you are young and skinny, nothing makes up for experience, and bulk, against the wind, and extreme heat. This was a tough day for any cyclist, but mostly those without experience. The heat was what I’d say extreme, well over 30, and past 35 for most of the day. The wind was strong on the back leg, coming home from Chilliwack. Michael hung on strong onto the wheel ahead of him right into the last rest stop, only 10 KM from home. I had an idea he was hurting, but no idea how bad. In one of those moments where parenting takes priority over all else, I went to him, and he broke down. It was like he was 5 again, just sobbing. He’d pushed himself to a place where 15 year olds should not push themselves. Obviously at that moment, I ended his day for him. Al, being our 1st responder, came right over. He recognized the situation immediately, Michael was in no physical danger (yet, but he had to stop), but this was purely an emotionally difficult moment. Al pulls my son aside, and says, “Michael, don’t worry about this. You need to understand, what you have done today is push yourself to a point that no 15 year old should ever do. Your mental strength is amazing, and from today forward you will have the understanding of your body’s limits, and what you are truly capable of. That’s pretty impressive stuff out of a 15 year old, you did amazing.”

    Sometimes as a dad on this ride, I am useless as a leader to my son. Sometimes you need that little bit of encouragement that someone else can give. On our ride, Al is bigger than life. For him to have that 20 second talk with Michael was amazing. I know I wasn’t capable of it at the time, and even if I was, would my words have meant as much as Al’s?

    _________________________________________________________________


    Rochelle beat Cancer some 20 years ago. The first time I met her was on the bike, I made a wrong move, and the bitched me out. Haha…I deserved it. Since then I’ve come to learn her story, and there isn’t any one word better than, Amazing. She’s one of the best cyclists I know, male or female. She could jump into racing right now and be a dominant masters female road racer. But, she focuses on leadership, and charity. I’ve ridden with Rochelle at the front of R2S more than a few times over the years. Me being at 185-200 lb range (depending on the year, and booze intake, lol), I have a distinct advantage charging into the wind. Rochelle is tiny…5’2” and if she’s a pound over 110, I’d be shocked. Despite that, I’ve never seen her crack. I can only imagine what it was like for her in fighting the disease, but to know her now, there is only one conclusion: Cancer never stood a chance against Rochelle. Always positive, always inspiring, and now riding across the country (in addition to R2S) to fight for the exact reason I ride: kids.

    293_R2S 2013 2740 bwk.jpg
    5864097158_b3b7dd3c38.jpg
    Oh, never mind Al and Rochelle seems to pump in between $5K-$10K of donations every year. Unreal cyclists, and fundraisers, both.
     
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  10. Dude

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    So, I donated to Al & Rochelle's pages for the Sears ride yesterday.

    Al is old, I expect him to send me a thank you note via smoke signal once the leaves dry out, but Rochelle sent me this note:

    "Hi Mike,

    Always there to ride beside you, figuratively and literally."

    Classy lady. Those two are heroes.
     
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  11. Dude

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  12. Dude

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    Thanks @kurgan. Let me know if there is a dedication this year.
     
  13. Dude

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    Thanks @Rangerforever for contributing again this year.

    This has been an especially tough year for RF when it comes to the C word, so an extra special Fcuk Cancer going out to you.
     
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  14. Dude

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    Long post alert, buckle in.

    I am WAY behind in doing what I’d intended to do here from the first day I posted, which was to give some regular updates, and to profile some of the Heroes of this Ride and cause. Shamefully, I haven’t been able to make the time, no excuses.

    Personally, I’m having a bit of a struggle dialing up my fitness this year after a monster year last year. I competed in my second- and last – Ironman triathlon. I wanted to knock 3 hours off my 2014 time, which meant some huge adjustments in my training. Needed 15 off my swim, an hour off my ride, and 2 hours off my run.

    The swim and bike, I actually had a pretty good handle on. Swimming is all mechanics, and I foolishly didn’t invest in a coach in 2014, but did last year. Huge gains. Cycling didn’t really mean a big change in mileage, but it did in the way I trained through winter in building power, and getting back to some racing roots, instead of just riding for the fun of it. Again, made huge gains there. Running wise- I fell apart in the 2014 and figure I could at any time throw on some ski boots and walk a marathon faster than I did in 2014. Still, 2 hours is a lot, and running simply does not come easy (as, ironically, most soccer player will relate to).

    So, a total of 3:15 needed- 15 extra for fall-apart buffer.

    Ended up knocking 22 off the swim, 51 off the bike (had some mechanicals, actually, so figure I would have otherwise been a bit better than an hour off), and 1:45 off my run. The run was still by far the hardest for me. I’m not build for marathons, but still, held a slow and steady pace for most of it, had some real trouble between KMs 28-37, where my legs gave up, and all I could do was long stride walk. Found my mojo again after that and was able to finish strong. In the end, 2:56 off my 2014 time, but more importantly, under 13 hours (12:54), which was the ultimate goal when I first decided to race the IM in 2014.

    Point being, the level of training and focus I needed to go to was everything I could handle, maybe a bit more. Mentally and physically, that race- and more specifically, the training for it- TTPed me. From that race through till March this year, my road bike only came down off the hook once. I spent a lot of August mountain biking in Whistler and the Chilcotins, swimming in Alta Lake, drinking my weight in beer, but not a day of anything I’d call training. Didn’t run at all until October. Funny thing…I’d actually signed on to play w/ Surrey United Masters. Pulled into the parking lot for the first training session in late August, and simply did not have it in me to even get out of the truck. So tired and burnt out on running, I emailed George and Utah right then and “retired” again. Then drove home for a beer.

    In addition to all this, as a family we pulled the trigger on a big life change over the summer- right in the midst of peaking for the effing IM. He have decided to sell out of Langley and move to Whistler full time. Sold then bought, and through the winter have had the house rented to a bunch of Aussies (we are renovating starting May 1, so we’ll get the smell and lingering VD out, not concerned), and we’ve been in a rental down here to let Michael go through his grade 12 year w/ his buddies, and my daughter one last year here.

    Needless to say, the last 18 months or so have been…a lot. It’s been a lot on the family, as well, especially my wife, who has to deal w/ a husband that seems to be going through a midlife crisis. Maybe I am, but I still don’t have a convertible corvette or 26 YO blond bombshell mistress, so I don’t think I’m there yet. The overall stress from the race and everything else (all self-inflicted, yes) actually had me pretty depleted as the calendar year rolled over into 2017.

    For me, getting back to a reasonable level of fitness on the bike has been a struggle. Finally starting to see it arrive now in April, and starting to feel normal, energy wise.

    Michael on the other hand, is becoming a beast on the bike. At 150 lbs, he’s testing to close the same FTP (functional threshold power) number that I do at 185 lbs. This means his Power / Weight ratio is way higher. It also means that in pretty much every conceivable category on a bike, he’s faster and stronger than I am. About the only area he’s still behind me in is on a DH mountain bike, and at that, he’s pretty goddamn fast, anyhow.

    He was able to win a few titles late last season in Cyclecross; the BC Cup, BC Premier Series, and Vancouver Cyclecross coalition. In doing so, he won a couple of races along the way, but his overall combination of points in all three were enough to put him on top in the three series’. Early this spring, he’s looking like a boss in the Cat 4 race category he’s in (this is an open men’s category, so he’s racing against not only kids his age, but adults), and should move up to Cat 3 by mid-season. This is his last year of racing junior, and as of next year will be considered and adult, so he’s looking to make the most of it.

    We had one seriously cool experience earlier this year in one of the road races. We were both in the mix in one of the early season Cat 4 races, going into lap 7 of a ~70 KM race. He and his teammates were being aggressive, and as a result, many of the riders had dropped off, somehow I was still hanging in. These races are often times one race w/ two or three races w/ in the race going on. In this case, the junior women were racing one of a few national team selection races, mixed into our group. Michael and 4 teammates were assigned to protecting a talented young lady within the pack, Elizabeth. They did so successfully for 6 laps, then all hell broke loose. Out of the team, only Michael, a kid named Ethan (very talented, National gold medalist in a couple of track events), and Elizabeth remained. The others had dropped off the pace. Ethan flats about ½ way through the lap, so it was then just Michael. Shortly after, disaster: with Michael “pulling” Liz (Liz was drafting his wheel in the safety of the front of the pack), one of the men in the group drifted over and clipped her wheel. I watched this girl l crash and literally cartwheel down the road. Total chaos as riders avoid her (me included). I look up to see Michael pull off the front and make a U-Turn- while others attacked the pack, smelling a win. No hesitation. I U-Turned as well. He’s checking her out, I’m fixing her bike on the road. She’s OK, and I’m bending her rear derailleur hanger back into place so that the bike will be somewhat operational. One last check to make sure she’s good (“Can you ride?” “Yes.” “Then let’s go!”), and off we go. We were down 3 minutes with, maybe, 5 KM to go. I look back and now you can see the rest of Liz’s group chasing us down. She had the win in the bag till the crash. Michael and I stuck her in behind and we took turns riding lead to try and get her home ahead of the pack, full of men and most of the rest of the women, chasing us down. Last hill, and maybe 1 KM from home, we look back and the pack is here. Michael says, “Liz, can you climb?” “Yes.” “The go Liz Go, the pack is here!”.

    Michael and I are shattered by this point. The solo efforting to hold off a pack (or in our case, two working to pull one) takes a toll. The pack will get you, because they can move faster as a group when it is motivated. Liz, however, had not only the reserves to pull even with the chase pack, but she won the goddamn sprint in the end, winning her selection race!

    I tell this story for a couple of reasons:

    1. To explain the attached photo. I told Michael that I wanted to finish arm-and-arm, he said no. I then guilt tripped him, saying this was the last chance I’d get. He’s getting way faster, I…am not. He’s going to be promoted to Cat 3 sooner than later, and I’m just hanging out in Cat 4. I guilt tripped him, telling him it was the last change I’ll get for a father son moment, eventually he obliged. Happy he did, fantastic shot!

    2. I learned something about my son and his leadership in that race. He was going to contest that one, no doubt. He was the one pushing the pace on the climbs to force riders off the back, he was riding strong near the front the whole time, but he never forgot his responsibility to his teammate. He’s also the oldest rider on the team this year, as they have no other 17 year olds. In his FB post that day (where he thanks the sponsors, team, etc.), he said he was counting that one as a win, and expressed his happiness for Elizabeth. That girl, BTW, will no doubt make the BC team selection, and will no doubt contest a National Junior title. Super talented 15 year old young lady.

    At R2S, he’s been asked to be one of the ride Captains. Crazy to think, he’s in his 4th year of riding this event, and he now has a shite load of experience in the event, and at the distance. On Good Friday we participated in a 110 KM training ride w/ R2S (most of this season we’ve had racing conflicts, so racing is prioritized). I watched as he guided / pushed a new rider through about 20 KMs, from the bottom of 264th in Fort Langley, to about 0 ave and 240th. Some good hills there, and always a headwind on 0. She finally pulled off out of pure exhaustion, but put in a great effort to that point. The kid was strong and unfazed, along with keeping the conversation going with her to try and help distract her from the hardship. Also feeding her, pulling out food from his pocket and getting her to eat while on the bike.

    Those are the types of things others did for him in his 1st year training, to help teach him about how to survive long days on the bike.

    It’s a different dichotomy, R2S vs. being a road racer. You can’t be a successful road racer (or competitive triathlete) by training exclusively for R2S, and you can’t be a successful R2S rider by training exclusively to race. I learned the hard part of that in 2014, figuring my mileage alone would prepare me for a 6 hour ride at Ironman Whistler. No dice. I had no speed. I could ride forever, and eat while riding, and feel relatively fresh after, but could not dial up the speed.

    Vice versa, training as a road racer- or any kind of racer- will not prepare any rider for the very long days on the bike, and for the teamwork needed, and for the nutritional part of the ride. It’s a different animal than anything out there, and fully on its own, a damn difficult endurance event.

    So…we once again try to find ways of balancing the two worlds. Michael focuses on training as a racer, and every couple of weeks to try to get in an R2S ride so that we can also get in the long, slow miles, and make sure we meet some of the new riders.

    Seems this year about ¼ of the riders registered are new to the event, and as always, there is a pretty good mix- from former elite racers, to people who’ve just jumped on the bike last fall with the goal of participating in this event. Usually it’s those people that have something else driving other than a notch on the belt buckle. Those are the people I focus on, and now Michael focuses on. We’re not huge fundraisers, we know our place.

    I am continuously amazed and impressed by some of the people I meet along the journey that is R2S. The slow training- as much as it drives me batshit crazy- is great for getting to know people. As I’ve written about in the past, some are there for reasons we all will only see in our worst nightmares.

    I have so far been blessed to be healthy, and for my family to be healthy- knock on wood. The statistics don’t favor this good fortune, so I literally live in fear that this disease will strike one of the kids, or my wife. Like I’m sure many reading this, fears for myself don’t come close to fears I have for others. Which is, ultimately, why I ride. Karma? I dunno. Being part of this thing now 9 years, it’s pretty abundantly clear that Cancer favors no man, and no woman. Teammates I’ve ridden with- strong, healthy people- have been sidelined. So…all these rides I’m sure buy me no credit. People we know as part of this community, no credit. There are even times when I have a lot of doubts about what we’re doing.

    Cancer is an industry, and fundraising to beat cancer is, too. I’m happy to be part of an organization that separates itself from that, but then I start asking questions about the Canadian Cancer Society. How do our funds get distributed? How do they help people. Most important…are we (the fundraising community) actually making a difference?

    One of the R2S folks I’ve come to learn on is Dr. Kevin Murphy. Dr. Kevin is a retired Oncologist. Joined R2S several years ago, maybe 5 or 6. He joined after hearing about the ride through one of his patients.

    This man has literally saved or positively influenced hundreds of lives in his work, so coming into R2S he was already a hero to many and individual or their family members.

    What makes him a hero to be is both his calming influence, and his steadfast insistence that fundraising for cancer research is making a difference. I have exchanged e-mails with the man when I’ve had my own doubts about the funding pathways, and results. Every year when people speak at the several meetings to prep, you see so many folks at their weakest. I see these meetings, and this ride, as very much like live action grief counseling…and there are so many riders dealing with grief. Either for the loved ones they’ve lost, or even what they’ve lost in their own battles. Then, Dr. Murphy gets up to speak. He’s analytical, he’s composed, he’s cool as a cucumber, and he goes into great detail explaining how funds like what we are raising get to the end destination, and how those funds actually make a positive contribution; how the funds actually save real lives. He goes on to state how lucky we are in Canada, not only with great treatment, but a medical system that will not refuse anyone. No, it’s not perfect, but as Canadians we find ourselves with very good fortune to be in this country, with this level of care, and this high end fundraising community that continues to make a real positive impact.

    For me, hearing him speak resets my focus, and reassures me that this isn’t just another business cloaked in goodwill (reminder, not one penny of monies raised w/ R2S get skimmed off the top for any costs, so 100% of every dollar gets into research funding), but we are actually delivering on the sincere pledge we make to our sponsors when we go out and ask for your hard earned dollars.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this chapter from War and Peace. It’s been a while since I’ve updated, so I gave a lot.

    If this is an important cause for you (Raising funds for Cancer Research), and you want to assure that 100% of your donation is going to research, and nothing is skimmed, please consider donating through our page, here. If not, all good. I never expect everyone to be donating to my cause. There is a lot of need out there, and the dollars need to get around. But if you do have a hankering, hit us up here: http://convio.cancer.ca/site/TR/Otherspecialevents/IFE_BC_even_?px=7098048&pg=personal&fr_id=22233



    ~Mike & Michael.
     
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  15. Rangerforever

    Better Bastard

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    Love it
     
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  16. utah

    utah Well-Known Member

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    Proud of you guys!!
     
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  17. Dude

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    @Sliver - thanks very much for the generous donation. Shoot me a message w/ a dedication.
     
  18. Dude

    Lifetime Better Bastard

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    Above I made reference to Dr. Murphy, and how he's been a calming influence on me, so far as "trusting the pathway" of funds raised.

    Below is a blog entry by Kerry Kunzli, and how R2S has been able to achieve matching funding in certain "Tough Cancer" areas. As a group, we've specifically targeted Cancers where research funding has been low, and as a result, survival rates still low. In his words:

    "Simple... Other cancer areas that now have good survival rates only got there because of funding. We believe we should aim our funding where it will have more impact. As one Canadian Cancer Society manager suggested: A Tough Ride for Tough Cancers."

    The following article isn't long, but it is a good look behind the curtain of R2S, and in a nutshell does a better job explaining the method to the madness than I can.

    https://ride2survive.ca/index.php?o...campaign=here-is-our-latest-ride2survive-blog
     
  19. Dude

    Lifetime Better Bastard

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    @Walks, many thanks again. Dedicated in memory of your dad?
     
  20. Walks

    Walks Well-Known Member

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    My pleasure @Dude, yes please, in memory of my Dad.

    Cheers !!
     
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